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Showing posts with label Senjo and her soul are seperated. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Senjo and her soul are seperated. Show all posts

9.19.2011

Zen Ghosts (2010)

Written and Illustrated by Jon J. Muth
Watercolor and Ink
17-point Monotype Fournier
Scholastic Press

This is the third - and so far, the last - book in Muth's Zen... series. I suppose that makes it a trilogy, but I hope to be wrong. This is by far my favorite entry, and might be a contender for my favorite picture book ever. It combines my new found interest with Zen Buddhism with what is clearly the greatest holiday of all time - Halloween. (For proof of my Halloween-love, please take a moment to read my Tales and Their Tellers column from last year.)

I really feel like he has captured Halloween perfectly, I've never seen it rendered so sensually. The familiar tropes are represented - trick-or-treating, Jack o' Lanterns, costumes - but it does not rely on those tropes in order to tell the story. The story lies elsewhere.

We begin in the bright, midday sunshine, gorgeous, vibrant fall foliage, and the exclamation: "Michael! There's a ghost outside!"

But it's no ghost, it's only Stillwater, standing as a lumbering, silent supernatural apparition.

The children are preparing for the evening's festivities, making costumes and last minute changes. Michael cannot choose between an owl or a pirate, leading Stillwater to propose, "Perhaps you will be an Owl-Pirate."

"There is no such thing!" Karl retorts. "He has to be one thing!"

I swear I've read this story a dozen times now, yet the significance of that line only now came to me, as I sit here writing this.

"He has to be one thing!"

Not so.

And I see now yet another clue to the story's core on the opposing page. It brings me a moment of gratification, as though the entire intent of this blog of mine were worth it, so that I may find these little treasures hidden within Muth's watercolors. As Addy unrolls the long, white fabric, asking, "Do you like my costume?" I can see the blue and purple geometric pattern growing in vibrancy the closer to the edge we get.

They do look like tiny butterflies, do they not? Indeed, two of them seem to magically fly off the fabric and flutter above Stillwater, one blue, one purple.

"After trick-or-treating, meet me by the big stone wall," says Stillwater, bidding them adieu, "And I will take you to the storyteller."

That evening, it is a perfect Halloween night. They sky is a deep blue, autumn leaves are blowing, children cast long shadows. How beautiful Addy looks, kneeling on the old stone with the long fabric of her costume flowing behind her, her blond hair obscuring her face, and I am again reminded of the passing of years within the universe of the story.

Stillwater leads them to his house, holding out spherical, paper lantern to lead the way on such a misty evening. His home, generally so suburban, now takes on the property of a haunted abode, straight from classic Halloween arcana. Inside, he introduces the children to another Giant Panda who looks exactly like Stillwater. In fact, it is Stillwater...Isn't it? The children are confused. The reader of the story is confused. After all, he has to be one thing...

Not so.

This Stillwater-who-is-not-Stillwater sits cross-legged on the floor before burning candles, produces a long, thick brush.

"I am going to draw you a story," he says, and it is with Stillwater's voice with which he speaks.

The story which he tells, Senjo and Her Soul Are Separated, was first written down in the 13th Century by Wu-men Hui-hai in a collection of koans called The Gateless Gate. It is a very, very old story, and Muth does a wonderful job charting the path of its existence - Sensei to Sensei - in a note at the end of Zen Ghosts.

"It's not an abstract, historic event that happened 1,000 years ago," he writes. "It's very much about you and me today."

I won't tell you the story itself - but it is extremely beautiful and eerie and involves ghosts. But which is the ghost? Suffice it to say, when the story is over, only one Stillwater remains, and it is not the Stillwater from the beginning of the tale. There is no explanation given as to this seeming contradiction.

"In Zen Buddhism," Muth writes, "the teacher who gives you a koan is looking to see if you truly have digested the question. And if you have, the answer becomes your own."

For more stories on Zen Buddhism, click here!
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